RESEARCH TEAM

Dr Stephanie Davis

Dr Stephanie Davis is a scholar-activist with an interest in the intersections of race, gender and sexuality. She received her PhD in Psychology from the University of Brighton and this was titled ‘Being a Queer and/or Trans Person of Colour in the UK: Psychology, Intersectionality and Subjectivity.’ She has previously worked in a community development and activist capacity on issues of sexual health with young people and Black Asian Minority Ethnic (BAME) communities and on issues facing her local community such as police harassment and gender and sexual diversity. In 2013 she co-founded Rainbow Noir, a social support and organising space for queer and trans people of colour (QTPOC) in Manchester. As a scholar-activist she is excited by the possibilities of working both within academia and beyond its boundaries for social change.

Shelley Watson

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Shelley is the administrator for the study, and is based at Lancaster University.  She is responsible for the social media presence of the study, as well as organising the meetings for the Research Team and Advisory Group.  She is often the first point of contact for the study.

Outside of work, Shelley enjoys cooking and baking (and eating!), yoga and gardening.

Charlie Tebrook

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Anna Roscher

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Anna is an LGBT Youth Worker at Allsorts Youth Project in Brighton, a charity that listens to, supports and connects LGBTU young people between the ages of 5 and 25.

She leads a weekly LGBTU safe space Drop-in  for the 16-25 age group, delivers targeted mental health support through the mental health and wellbeing group Open Minds, and offers 1:1 emotional support through the Talk it Out service.

She is passionate about providing safe and empowering spaces and support for LGBTU youth.

Prof Flis Henwood

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Flis is Professor of Social Informatics in the School of Applied Social Science, University of Brighton.

Her current research works at the boundary of sociology of health and illness and science and technology studies (STS) to explore how digital health technologies are embedding in health and care practices.

Her current EU project involves a sociotechnical evaluation of mHealth in the context of HIV care and includes participatory practices with clinicians and people living with HIV.

https://research.brighton.ac.uk/en/persons/flis-henwood

Prof Katherine Johnson

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Katherine Johnson is a project Co-I and leading the research team at the University of Brighton, where she is Visiting Professor in the Centre for Transforming Sexuality & Gender. Katherine is also Professor & Director, Social and Global Studies Centre, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.

She has over 20 years’ experience working in the field of LGBT mental health and well-being, often in collaboration with community partners, including Mind, MindOut and Allsorts.

https://research.brighton.ac.uk/en/persons/katherine-johnson

Prof Steven Pryjmachuk

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Steven is Professor of Mental Health Nursing in the University of Manchester’s School of Health Sciences. As well as being a Registered Mental Health Nurse, Steven is also a Chartered Psychologist.

Steven’s teaching, clinical and research interests lie in children and young people’s mental health, stress and the wellbeing of student health professionals and how students are supported to learn independently.

https://www.research.manchester.ac.uk/portal/steven.pryjmachuk.html

Dr Emily Pattinson

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Emily obtained her PhD at the University of Winchester in 2017.  Her thesis investigated the performance-enhancing properties of self-efficacy on competitive springboard and highboard divers. She presented findings from her PhD at the FINA world medical congress in 2016 and was awarded the Cameron Award for outstanding contributions to Aquatic Research.   Her interests outside of work are highboard diving, BMX, sewing and drawing.

https://medicinehealth.leeds.ac.uk/healthcare/staff/4536/dr-emily-pattinson

Prof Liz Hughes

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Liz is a professor of mental health at the School of Healthcare at the University of Leeds. She is a mental health nurse by background and worked in acute inpatient services and substance use services in London and the South of England.

Liz has an academic career spanning almost 20 years and her research interests span broadly the intersection of physical health and mental health. This began as an interest in drugs/alcohol and mental health. More recently she has developed an interest in the intersection between sex and mental health and has led an NIHR study which evaluated sexual health promotion for people with serious mental illness.

https://medicinehealth.leeds.ac.uk/healthcare/staff/2073/professor-elizabeth-hughes

Prof Liz McDermott

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Liz is a public health specialist in LGBTQ young people’s mental health. She is a public health practitioner by background and previously worked for a decade in the NHS. Her research expertise is focussed on explaining why there are inequalities in young people’s mental health, and unravelling the mechanisms by which poor mental health is distributed unfairly across the adolescent and young adult population.

Liz was also the Chief Investigator of the Queer Futures study funded by the Department of Health that produced the first national evidence in England on LGBTQ youth, suicide, self-harm and help-seeking. The results from the study have made an important contribution to explaining why young people who are non-heterosexual may self-harm or feel suicidal, and how they seek help. The study results have contributed to mental health policy and practice both nationally and internationally and have been utilized by the UK Government National Suicide Prevention Strategy, Deputy Chief Medical Office Public Health England, and Government Equalities Office.

https://www.lancaster.ac.uk/health-and-medicine/about-us/people/elizabeth-mcdermott

Check out the latest @Mental_Elf blog about our literature review and synthesis on #lgbtq+ youth mental health supp… https://t.co/2KmqUCB4dC6:59 PM May 30th